How To: Mosaic Vases

One of the most challenging projects at our Elementary Art Camp was the Mosaic Vases. I had completed this project several years before and did not remember it being too hard. However the students still did an amazing job and had so much fun with this project and the vases turned out beautiful!

Keep reading to find out how we made these creative mosaic vases.

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Step One: The first thing we had our campers do was draw out their design for their mosaic on a piece of scratch paper. We told them they could do anything they wanted. Some students did flowers, some did landscape scenes and one student even made a mosaic of our family dog, Rocko.

Step Two: Next, the campers picked out glass pieces and planned their design.

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Step Three: The hard part – sticking different sizes of glass on round vase surfaces. This was the most challenging part of the whole project. We had glue that we normally used for mosaics but the pieces kept sliding around and falling off, our students were creative though and had fun making it work.

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Step Four: Once the glue dried overnight the campers got messy the next morning and started putting grout around their glass pieces.

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Step Five: After the grout set up for an hour or so the campers came back and polished all of their glass pieces and cleaned the grout off. The vases turned out so cool and looked even better with some flowers in them!

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How To: Colorful Animal Collages

What a crazy few weeks it has been at the studio! We successfully had our first two camps and they were so much fun. The elementary students explored color through different mediums and our teens practiced their drawing and painting skills. We will be posting about different projects from camp throughout the summer, starting with one of my favorites: colorful animal collages.

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The students got so into this project and had such a fun time making these crazy, colorful collages. I love this project because it combined fun with practicing artistic skills. Keep reading to see a step-by-step overview of how to complete this project as well as see the finished results!

Step One: Have the students scribble or create some kind of design using crayons or pastels on big sheets of paper. Then, using watercolor, tempura paint or dye from a tie-dye kit, have the students paint over their design to make bold and colorful paper. Make sure they know that everyone is sharing their paper creations.

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Step Two: Let the students brainstorm about what kind of animal they want to create. We let the campers choose from birds, cats and dogs but a few students got creative and did wolves, bunnies and hamsters.

Step Three: Assemble the base of the collage once paper has dried. Have the students tear or cut up the colorful paper and post it on stiff cardboard or paper using Elmer’s glue.

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Step Four: Using black acrylic paint, trace the outline of the animal’s eyes, noses and mouth on multimedia paper. The shape of these features changes based on the animal so the students were shown demonstrations and samples but also used reference photos. See examples of the different animals at the end of this post.

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Step Five: Fill in the eyes using different shades of oil pastels. Trace the outline of the eye with the darkest shade and slowly blend to lighter colors to make the eye pop. Allow the students to color in the mouth and nose with pastels or acrylic paint as well.

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Step Six: Paste the facial features on the collage using glue then have the students add finishing touches with acrylic paint such as whiskers, fur or ears. Fan brushes are great for this step.

Step Seven: Admire your work!

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Dog Collage:

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Cat Collages (this was a popular choice):

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Owl Collage:

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Bunny Collage:

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Hamster Collage:

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Hope everyone is having a great summer!

Day 3 – Shooting on Manual

For our last day of photo camp, we put the concepts from the days before together and shot in Manual Mode.  All photos in this post are by students of the photo camp.

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We ventured out on this very cold today into the beautiful neighborhood of Hollywood Hill.

 

And visited the farm and floral studio of Flori Flowers.

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Thank you Flori Flowers for sharing your beautiful animals, space and talent with us.

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Thank you for sharing the last three days with me.

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I hope that you learned something about using your camera in manual mode and, most importantly, had fun!

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XO, Jamie

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“A great photograph is a full expression of what one feels about what is being photographed in the deepest sense, and is, thereby, a true expression of what one feels about life in its entirety.” – Ansel Adams

Day Two – Photo Camp Shutter Speed

Today we braved the cold and ventured to Kenmore Air to practice Shutter Speed.  All photos in this post were taken today by students.

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SHUTTER SPEED:  Controls how long your shutter stays open for, and so also controls how much light reaches the sensor.

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Leaving your shutter open a long time, smaller number, will let in lots of light and will capture motion as it moves – meaning you will see it as a blur.  Anything under 1/60 requires a tripod.

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A short shutter speed, a faster number like a quick blink, freezes a moment in time without blur. You would use this if you want to freeze a fast-moving bird, animal, or car in your photo. A shutter speed of anything faster than 1/500th of a second is considered ideal for freezing an object, but this may vary depending on the speed of the subject.

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Thank you Kenmore Air for hosting us!

 

 

Aperture – Day 1 Photo Camp

Today was the beginning of our three day mini photo 101 camp.  As we are learning to take our camera’s off auto, we focused on Aperture Today.

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The photos in this post were taken by students during the workshop today.

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APERTURE:  The aperture of a lens is how wide the lenses opens when you take a photo and ranges from wide to narrow, and is measured in f/stops, such as f/4 (wide aperture) to f/22 (narrow aperture). AV

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  • The smaller the number, the wider the aperture, the more light is let in  and the smaller the depth of field.   So, for a portrait, you want the subject in focus but the background to be blurred.  You would use a low aperture.  I love a shallow depth of field so I shot a lot of my photos on the lowest aperture that I can.

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  • The opposite of this is true as well.  The narrower the aperture, the less light is let in, darkening your shots an resulting in a larger the depth of field.  While shooting landscapes or citys capes, you might want to have both the foreground and the background in focus.  For this you would want a high aperture value, f/16 or f/22 to get deep depth of field.

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  • We shot in  Aperture Priority mode today which allows you to take control of the aperture, leavingthe shutter speed and ISO to be controlled controlled by the camera.   We practiced adjusting the amount of light entering into the camera through the lens and setting our depth of field.

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Tomorrow we will explore shutter speed.

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Photography 101 – Mini Camp

Photography 101 Mini Camp – Take your Camera Off Automatic

February 17, 18 and 19th, 10:00 am – 2:00 pm  SOLD OUT

$185;  Minimum of 6 students; Ages 14 and over, adults welcome!

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To know me is to know that I love taking photographs.  My first memories of photography are with my parent’s old polaroid that had the rotating flash bulb on top.  I remember I was only allowed to take a few photos a week because the film and flash was expensive.

In high school, I purchased my own SLR camera.  After having photos published on Associated Press, I took my earnings and bought the equipment for my first darkroom.  My love of photography continued to grow in college and beyond.

I am excited to share the basics of photography with you.  You will learn to take your camera off auto and shoot in the manual mode.  This workshop is an introduction to the core techniques that will help you get more out of your digital SLR camera. Learn to navigate the menu options of your camera and make practical adjustments in aperture, shutter speed and white balance.  We will also cover basic composition, focal points, perspective, movement and orientation.

Requirements:

  • Minimum age of 14
  • Digital SLR camera with a charged batter and empty memory card.
  • Laptop or other devise to download photos onto for sharing.
  • Sack lunches

We will spend the mornings in the studio going over some basics and, weather permitting, the afternoons out and about in Woodinville working on depth of field, movement and composition.

REGISTER HERE – WORKSHOP IS FULL

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