Last Week of Encaustics

We were busy with encaustics in our Adult and Middle/High School Classes this week.

Encaustics

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As a reminder, The Studio will be closed Oct 26th to November 8thWe will reopen with all classes the weeks of November 9th and the 16th.  Thanksgiving is the week of November 23rd. We will have class on Tuesday that week but will not be holding classes on November 25th or November 26th.

The Studio will be open the first three weeks of December closing for Winter Break on December 18th.

As always, feel free to email me with any questions.

See you-all soon!

Finishing our Henri Rousseau Watercolor Paintings

We finished our Henri Rousseau-styled jungle paintings in the Elementary Art Classes this week.  The students worked so hard and did such a great job.  While adding color, we reviewed warm and cool colors again and we talked about complimentary colors.  We made the gray for the elephant by mixing the complimentary colors of yellow and purple.

Thanks for sharing your student with me!  It is such a pleasure to have them in classes!

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As a reminder, The Studio will be closed Oct 26th to November 8thWe will reopen with all classes the weeks of November 9th and the 16th.  Thanksgiving is the week of November 23rd. We will have class on Tuesday that week but will not be holding classes on November 25th or November 26th.

The Studio will be open the first three weeks of December closing for Winter Break on December 18th.

As always, feel free to email me with any questions.

See you-all soon!

Henri Rousseau’s Jungle – Elementary Classes

We are learning about the artist Henri Rousseau at Picket Fence Art this week. In addition to being introduced to a new artist, we talked about how to use lines to create tone in a drawing, warm and cool colors and composition.

Henri Rousseau Paintings

Henri Rousseau Paintings

Hatching, cross hatching, and other line techniques:

Line can be used to apply tone (light and shadow) to a drawing. This can be done by altering the:

  • Gap between the lines
  • Lightness / darkness of the line
  • Thickness of the line

There are many line techniques that can be used to create tone. Common techniques include:

  • Small dashes
  • Hatching (long, parallel lines on an angle)
  • Cross-hatching (parallel lines at right angles)
  • Stippling (dots)
  • Scribbles
  • Small crosses
  • Small circles

The angle that these techniques are applied may remain constant within a drawing, or it may change in response to the angle and direction of the forms.

Application:

We read The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau by Michelle Markel.

Henri Rousseau did not start painting until he was 40 years old but he dreamed of becoming a famous artists. He worked during the day as a tollbooth operator and would paint in the evenings. He liked to paint the jungle even though he never visited one. Art critics did not like his self-taught style but other artist friends encouraged him to keep painting.   His paintings resemble storybook illustrations. His skills and art were not appreciated until after he died.

The students then drew their own jungles on watercolor paper.   Everyone was encouraged to start with one lion and to add as many other animals as they wanted. They then drew the dense jungle scene in the background. We filled in the jungle with various lines to create tone and texture.

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Henri Rousseau Paintings

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Henri Rousseau Paintings

The drawings were outlined with Sharpie marker and painted with watercolor. The background is painted with cool colors to make it recede.

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Henri Rousseau’s Jungle

Next week we will paint the animals with warm colors to make them come forward.

Take It Home: Practice drawing by completing a mirror image of the lion and then draw in the jungle in the background. You can also check out this video about Henri Rousseau’s artwork on YouTube.

To celebrate fall, we will be making some leaf prints next week after we finish our Henri Rousseau’s Jungle paintings.  Feel free to send some leaves from your own yard and we will spend a few minutes collecting them around the studio as well.

As a reminder, there will be no classes the weeks of October 26th and November 2nd.

Thanks for sharing your student with me.

Zentangle Hands – Middle School Art Class

In our Middle School class we learned about Line Technique to create 3 D dimension and texture.

We started the lesson by giving each student a sketchbook. We looked at examples of sketchbooks and how they can be used (although there are no rules!). Each week we will take a few minutes to copy what we are learning into our sketchbook and to practice. During the week, the students are encouraged to mark it up and bring in whatever they have created to the next class to share if they feel comfortable doing so.

Hatching, cross hatching, and other line techniques:

Line can be used to apply tone (light and shadow) to a drawing. This can be done by altering the:

  • Gap between the lines
  • Lightness / darkness of the line
  • Thickness of the line

There are many line techniques that can be used to create tone. Common techniques include:

  • Small dashes
  • Hatching (long, parallel lines on an angle)
  • Cross-hatching (parallel lines at right angles)
  • Stippling (dots)
  • Scribbles
  • Small crosses
  • Small circles

The angle that these techniques are applied may remain constant within a drawing, or it may change in response to the angle and direction of the forms.

Application: 3 D hand drawings

We started by practicing different line patterns that we use to create different effects in our art journals. Please have your student bring these to each lesson and we will add to the journals as we go. They are also encouraged to mark-up their journals during the week and bring them in to share what they have created in class.

We practiced line by creating 3D hand drawings.We added a cool background to our hands and warm colors on the hands to make them look even more dimensional.

We then drew  Zentangle hands.

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Zentangles are miniature pieces of unplanned, abstract, black and white art. We looked at how you can create different textures by using different lines.

Take it Home:

Each student was given a sketchbook. Each week we will add a new art concept to the sketchbook. The students are encouraged to mark it up during the week applying what we talked about in class and whatever may inspire them during the week.

Zentangle Hands

Zentangle Hands

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Andy Warhol Pop Art – Wednesday Elementary Class

We learned about Pop Art in our Elementary Art Class on Wednesday.

Wed Elementary Art - Pop Art

We started the class by talking about Pop Art and Andy Warhol’s famous prints. Pop artists celebrated commonplace objects and people of everyday life, in this way seeking to elevate popular culture to the level of fine art

Andy Warhol was drawn to the glamorous worlds of Hollywood, fashion, and celebrity.

His interest in pop culture manifested itself early on in his childhood collection of autographed celebrity photographs. Warhol bought and read teen magazines and tabloids to stay current on what was pop, even into adulthood. He carried this interest into his artwork, creating iconic paintings of mega-stars such as Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Taylor. Warhol appropriated images for his portraits from magazines, newspapers, or directly from publicity photographs.

Andy Warhol used common everyday objects for his art such as soup cans, cars, butterflies and panda bears. We looked at and talked about his famous Campbell’s Soup Cans paintings.

Warhol’s iconic series of Campbell’s Soup Cans paintings were never meant to be celebrated for their form or compositional style, like that of the abstractionists. What made these works significant was Warhol’s co-opting of universally recognizable imagery, such as a Campbell’s soup can, Mickey Mouse, or the face of Marilyn Monroe, and depicting it as a mass-produced item, but within a fine art context. In that sense, Warhol wasn’t just emphasizing popular imagery, but rather providing commentary on how people have come to perceive these things in modern times: as commodities to be bought and sold, identifiable as such with one glance. This early series was hand-painted, but Warhol switched to screenprinting shortly afterwards, favoring the mechanical technique for his mass culture imagery. 100 canvases of campbell’s soup cans made up his first solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles, and put Warhol on the art world map almost immediately, forever changing the face and content of modern art.

For our project we made an Andy Warhol inspired block print.

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We choose a simple image to print such as an ice cream cone, cupcake or a coke bottle.   We learned about block printing and how the carved lines will not show on the print. We then printed the object four times and mounted it on black paper.

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We took this opportunity to also learn about warm and cool colors.

Take it Home: In addition to the artwork, each student took home their blocks. On the front of the block is the Andy Warhol styled image and I let them make whatever design they wanted on the back. Just apply ink and you can remake this image over and over.

We had a special helper today!  My daughter who is a sophomore at University of Washington came over to help with class.  She loved it so much she wants to come back next week.

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Elementary Art on Tuesdays – Chihuly Bowls

We kicked off our first week of art classes at Picket Fence Art Studio with the Tuesday Elementary Art Class.

We learned about Seattle’s very own Dale Chihuly. We talked about how Seattle has several glass artist including Mr. Chihuly.

He was born in Tacoma and studied at UW and cofounded the Pilchuck School of glass near Stanwood.   Mr. Chihuly studied glass blowing all over the world including at the Murano factory in Venice.

We also talked about the Chihuly Garden at the Seattle Center and we looked at photos of some of his bowls and some examples of glass bowls.

Chihuly bowl at exhibit in Seattle.

Chihuly bowls.

We then made are own Chihuly Bowls and painted them with transparent paint and then outlined them with Chihuly’s signature rim.

While painting them, we talked about warm and cool colors.

Warm and cool colors appear opposite each other in the color spectrum.

Warm colors are made with orange, red, yellow and combinations of them all. As the name indicates, they tend to make you think of sunlight and heat. Warm colors look as though they come closer because they have longer visual wavelengths. Red emits the longest visual wavelength of all.
Cool colors such as blue, green and light purple have the ability to calm and soothe and look as though they recede into the background. The color with the shortest visual wavelength of all is violet.

Each student was then encouraged to make their own bowls using their own unique styles and the creativity really got flowing.  We ended the session making stands for our bowls.

As a reminder $25 for tuition for October is due. You can make checks out to Picket Fence Art or Jamie Eppenauer.

Thanks for sharing your student with me!  It was a great start.

Elementary Art Chihuly Bowls

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